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Salt Spring Apple Co.
Our Apples

Our Top 25

Here they are: our premiere selection of apple varieties. We consider these to be the varieties most likely to consistently produce magnificent and memorable fruit in our Salt Spring Island orchard. Read more

 

Cider Kings

We definitely don't stop at 25 varieties. In fact, we consider these 17 traditional cider varieties (with a couple of crabs and a diminutive super-juicer thrown in) to be the secret to Real Cider. They're most certainly worth checking out. Read more

 

The Whole 333

In a world blessed with thousands of apple varieties, not making our Top 25 or Cider Kings lists is hardly cause for embarrassment. Every one of these 333 apples is a winner in our books. Read more

Cox's Pomona

Why you should be excited:

Cox's Pomona is a sister of Cox's Orange Pippin, bred by the same person at the same time, using the same parents.

 

The story of Cox's Pomona:

apple_coxspomona.jpgTo most North Americans, news that Cox's Pomona is likely a sibling of Cox's Orange Pippin is less than stunning news. But to those in England -- where Cox Pippin is revered -- it's pretty exciting.

The two have much in common, both raised by Richard Cox around 1925 from the seed of a Ribston Pippin, both introduced to the rest of the world around 1850 and both desirable apples.

From there, the two stories diverge, as Cox's Orange Pippin gained great and lasting fame, which Cox's Pomona has never been more than a multi-purpose apple of limited renown. You might think of it as the Dennis Hull of appledom.

Best known as a cooker, this is a crisp and tasty apple that deserves to be better known.

Cox's Pomona Facts

Its origins:

Raised from seed in Berkshire, England around 1825; introduced in 1850.

Flavour, aroma, texture:

Crisp and tart when eaten fresh. Cooked, it breaks down into a sweet, yellowish puree.

Appearance:

The greenish-yellow background skin colour of this large, irregularly-shaped apple is partly covered with broken red stripes.

When they’re available:

Mid-season (usually in late September).

Quality for fresh eating:

Good.

Quality for cooking:

Very good.

Keeping ability:

Good (2 or 3 months when kept refrigerated).

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Salt Spring Apple Company Ltd.

info@SaltSpringAppleCompany.com

Apple products: 250-538-2197

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